Interactive English: Reception

Reading and Listening

Achievement Check 2

on January 23, 2013

punctuation

For the achievement check next week, you will have one listening component and one reading component. Look at both of the questions below and answer one of them in the comments.

1. The listening component is about vexillology. Look up that word and then tell us what you think we will hear about.

2. The reading component is an opinion article from a newspaper covering the topic of punctuation on the Internet. What do you expect to read about?

And don’t forget to bring your journal to hand in at the beginning of class!

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8 responses to “Achievement Check 2

  1. Shogo Inoue says:

    Hi

    I’ll do the homework, before I forget to do it.

    2. The reading component is an opinion article from a newspaper covering the topic of punctuation on the Internet. What do you expect to read about?

    I suppose that we will hear about the usage of punctuation on the internet. On the internet young people use the different kind of spelling, grammar and punctuation which is easier and faster to type. For example, young people abbreviate words such as “Be right back” which become “brb” also “laugh out loud” becomes “lol” or something like “u2” or “w8”. For punctuation same thing might be happening. Maybe something like “I’m” become “Im” or “You’re” become “youre”. When I used to live in Australia, I used to use these words on the MSN. In the article they might tell the reader that there is a danger of young people not being able to use the spelling, grammar and punctuation properly due to the wrong usage.

  2. Satomi Togari says:

    Question 1

    vexillology = the study of flags. origin = latin: vexill = flag

    I think we will learn the origins of certain flags and what they (ex: colors, symbols) represent in the listening. Maybe we’ll also get to know the roles of a national flag in a certain historical event (ex: wars), or the symbolic meaning in protests (ex: burning a flag in public).
    Speaking of burning flags, I found a rather cheerful (and pointless) site called “Flag burning” where you can virtually burn flags….*raises an eyebrow*

  3. Wataru Okubo says:

    Hi!
    1. The listening component is about vexillology. Look up that word and then tell us what you think we will hear about.

    I had never heard of vexillology until now! I was amazed that there is a field of study of flags and that the article in Wikipedia has a lot of information about it. Whenever I find such articles I can’t help but thinking that the Internet is composed of a bunch of good people (AKA Wikipedieans) and I think that would be enough to compensate all the typos, bad grammar, and punctuations people make on the Internet.

    So here’s the description fetched from Wikipedia:
    Vexillology is the “scientific study of the history, symbolism[,] and usage of flags or, by extension, any interest in flags in general”

    The huge difference from other designs is the principles of flag design. Because it is used as a flag, which sways in the wind and is usually set in a place that gets attention from people, the vexillographers have to consider the possible situations; how it would look like from different distances, angles, etc.
    “The flag principles” by NAVA (1. Keep it simple. 2. Use meaningful symbolism. 3. Use 2-3 basic colors. 4. No lettering or seals. 5. Be distinctive or be related.) was interesting, too. I think the same thing can be said to the uniforms in sports (maybe because the purpose of uniform is almost the same?)
    As for the 2nd principle, however, I assume there is no universal symbolism as long as there are different cultures. For example, the red circle in the center of the Japanese flag represents the sun, but I heard the color of the sun differs from culture to culture and French people think yellow is the color of the sun. So, they may not naturally take it as the symbol for the sun. Also, while the yellow circle in Argentina’s flag means the sun, the one in Palau’s flag means the moon. It’s interesting the same color is used to represent both the sun and the moon, though!

    I learned that in the Muslim world, they have a traditional rule as to the flags. Black, white, red and green are favored as well as crescent moon and star. By the way, I found myself able to read Arabic script (because Urdu is written in the Persian alphabet, so this doesn’t mean I can understand Arabic) on a flag like the one of Iraq or Saudi Arabia and I thought it was great. The one of Saudi Arabia is called the shahada, which means “There is no god but God, Muhammad is the messenger of God”. It’s said that the shahada is also used by extreme terrorists and I think I saw one when I was watching the news about Algeria hostage crisis.

    It’s good for me to know the designers of the flags of South Asian countries (Pakistan, India, Bangladesh). I think–without bias–Pakistan’s flag is one of the coolest flags. What was most interesting to me was that Pingali Venkayya, designer of the flag of India, learned Urdu and Japanese at college! Suddenly, I felt closer to him and the India’s flag is now in my top 10 list!

    I hope any of what I learned about vexillology can help to understand the listening.

    As for the punctuation on the Internet, I guess the topic would be: the confusion of dash (–) and hyphen (-) , apostrophe (‘) and grave accent (`), and Oxford comma.

  4. Shino says:

    hi
    punctuation on the internet sounds interesting.
    i think it will be what the author thinks about people using
    abriviations for a word or a meaning. such as lol or faces in Japanese. like (^ω^)
    I once heard an interesting thing about how each country express laughter.
    English users use lol. Japanese use wwwww or (笑)
    Korea and Brasil use kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk.
    Thailand uses 5555555555555555.

  5. Takumi Nakanishi says:

    2. The reading component is an opinion article from a newspaper covering the topic of punctuation on the Internet. What do you expect to read about?

    I guess that it is about ways of using punctuation on the Internet or about emoticons using punctuation like 🙂

  6. Ayumi Sugaya says:

    Hi.
    I chose the first question.

    1. The listening component is about vexillology. Look up that word and then tell us what you think we will hear about.
    I used my English-Japanese dectionary first, but I couldn’t understand the meaning of the Japanese word which was equivalent for the “vexillology”. So I tried to use an English-English dictionary. It said “vexillology”=”the study of flags”
    I think we will hear some stories wihch concern about the origines or meanings of the nationa flags of some countries. For example, when did the country decide on the national flag,and what is the meaning of the colors and design of the flag. We will also hear about the importance and the value of national flags.

  7. saya says:

    2.The reading component is an opinion article from a newspaper covering the topic of punctuation on the Internet. What do you expect to read about?

    I think we are going to read about how punctuations are used in email or tweet and how difference they are from the way they are used in handwriting.
    I tend to use more punctuation(especially !) when typing. Maybe it is because we can’t see the face each other and we can’t tell emotion with facial expression. Using ! helps me to tell my feeling of surprise or passion.
    It is interesting that punctuations are also used in facial icons such as : ) or (*^^*).
    Punctuations are essential in online communication.

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