Interactive English: Reception

Reading and Listening

Listening Tips

on November 2, 2012

In the next class we will practice our listening skills in preparation for Achievement Check #1 that is on November 13th. For homework, please watch this 5-minute video of Kellee Santiago explaining why and how game design is important to real life. Before you listen to her presentation, think about what you know about video games. Then predict what you might hear. As you listen, compare what you hear with what you expected. Finally, after the listening, critically evaluate your listening skills as well as the information she provided. Look at the questions below, choose one, then answer it in the comments.

1. Did accessing your background information and predicting help you to understand the speech? If so, how? If not, why not?

2. As you listened and compared what she said with what you expected, did it help you understand the speech better? If so, how? If not, why not?

3. How well could you understand her speech? What kinds of things helped your comprehension and what might have hindered your understanding?

Also, as you read pages 63-85 of Paranoid Park, keep track of the characters and map and answer the following questions (make sure all information is in your journal):

1. Why does he want to go to confession?

2. On pg66 it says his mom is “flustered”. Without using a dictionary guess what this means. Explain how you think she feels.

3. On pg71 it says he “got burned”. Without using a dictionary, what do you think he meant by that exactly?

4. On pg76 he says, “I felt like the biggest shitkicker”. What do you think a “shitkicker” is?

5. On pg77 he says, “They were like my dad”. What does he mean by this?

6. Near the bottom of pg83 he says, “That’s part of the skater thing”. What does he mean by this? What is the “thing”?

7. What has he decided to do about his secret?

8. What do you think will happen in the next 20 pages?

If you missed class, I’ll put copies of this week’s reading in the box in front of my office (#629).

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6 responses to “Listening Tips

  1. Satomi Togari says:

    1. Did accessing your background information and predicting help you to understand the speech? If so, how? If not, why not?

    Not exactly.

    When I thought about video games, the negative aspects (ex) violence, addiction, bad for eyesight, etc…) were the first things that sprung to my mind,
    and as I don’t play them much I couldn’t guess how designing them would help us in our daily lives. Game designing and happiness in real life seemed like two completely different things, and I couldn’t see the connection between them.
    After listening to the speech, I sort of understood what she was trying to say; achieving something when playing games definitely did have a good feeling to it, and getting into the pattern of winning games did make me temporarily happy.
    Predicting what I was going to hear (I thought she was going to talk about how game designing would give people=gamers a chance to escape into a virtual world without having to worry about other things) didn’t exactly help me in understanding what I was going to hear because
    what I’d predicted was wrong, but recounting my few memories with video games did make me feel ready for listening to the speech.

    Game designing seems like a fun occupation by the way!

  2. Shogo Inoue says:

    1. Did accessing your background information and predicting help you to understand the speech? If so, how? If not, why not?

    It didn’t help me understand the speech better.

    When I think about video games I think about the games we actually play on the computer or on the TV. I sometimes play video games, with my friend but it’s one way to spend time with your friends.
    Some say that it is good to predict before you read or hear something, but I don’t think so. It will be useful it what you predicted is talked or written in the writing, but if it isn’t it is just a waste of time. It is important to predict, when you are researching something and to see the difference between what you predicted and the result you got to see the difference but, when you are just reading or listening to the information you don’t need to see that difference.
    Off course if you had background information, it would be easier for you to understand the topics deeper, but you don’t always have background information with you, so it might be better to train yourself to understand without having the background information.

  3. Wataru Okubo says:

    Hi

    3. How well could you understand her speech? What kinds of things helped your comprehension and what might have hindered your understanding?

    I suddenly remembered one game called Age of Empires when I started to think about video games. This is a game that players control a civilization and lead it to victory by destroying the opposite player’s civilization or achieving goals. In that process, you gather resources for units, buildings and technologies and the more effort you put, the more the civilization thrives. Also, every strategy is at your hand and you have to concentrate and use your brain, which is the most interesting point; you can’t win just pushing the button or clicking the mouse. I liked this game so much when I was little and since this is based on history (for example, you can choose from Greece, Egypt, Sumer, Yamato(ancient Japan), Rome and so on and the game system is also based on history, like if you invent wheel, you can make chariots), I learned a lot from it and it helped me imagine things when I took world history in high school. So in some sense I owe my interest in the ancient history to this game. Thank you Microsoft.
    Writing about it brought a ton of nostalgia… I was always wishing I had someone to play with but no one around me even knew it though it was absolutely more interesting than collecting poor pokemons!!

    What I expected to hear was, as the title says, the concepts from game design that can be applied to real life or have meaning in real life. And I think I understood the basic, important concepts of her speech. I jotted down some key points while listening to her speech and it helped me remember important words and understand the structure of the speech. Also, the slides were simple and her voice was clear and that made it easy to follow.
    Taking examles of puppies and sports at first made it clear what she’s talking about because then I figured she uses “game” in a broad way, not just for video games. In that definition, I think if there is just one rule and player, we can call it a game and that means life is full of game!(not as easy as video games though) And she believes game (role playing) can be an important practice for skills living as an adult.

    She explains why game design means important in real life in terms of the nature of brain: brain likes patterns. Learning game design lets us make rules of game that include good conbinations of pattern. What connects real life(brain) and game design is emotion, or happiness. Thus, the process goes like this: 1)from the ancient ages people have been seeking out happiness 2) getting into the state of flow helps us feel happy 3) set well-balanced rules that give you challenge, goals and feedback in order to experience “flow” and to be happy.
    I found out why I don’t like living with to do lists. It certainly gives me clear goals and a little feeling of accomplishment each day but if there’s no big objective it’s like doing boring duties and not fun at all. So I have to make more practical plans using the concepts of game design. But, is there any way to enter into the state of flow when writing a report with the deadline looming?

    I think it’s good for all of us that flow theory wasn’t named after his name, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi!

  4. Ayumi Sugaya says:

    2. As you listened and compared what she said with what you expected, did it help you understand the speech better? If so, how? If not, why not?

    Comparing what she said with what I expected helped my comprihension, because the gap between them made me surprise and gain a deeper interest. Before I heard this speech, I expected that I would hear a speech focused only on video games. My prediction was that this speech would tell me some merits of programing video games such as we could develop a skill of making many alternatives in our real life. Because I don’t have video games and I rarely play them, this prediction wasn’t attractive. However, as I listened, it turned out that the presentator mentioned not only about video games but also about all kinds of games which have patterns to win. I think this gap between her speech and my expectation made my concentration of hearing high.

  5. saya says:

    3. How well could you understand her speech? What kinds of things helped your comprehension and what might have hindered your understanding?

    I used the tips when I learned when I was in high school. I was not good at reading and so slow. Then, my English teacher advised me to ①classify the passage into important parts and not important parts like examples or supplement and read the former one very closely while skimming over the latter one. ②Pay attention to the words which leads to the writer/speaker’s opinions such as ‘so’ ‘ in short’ ‘Therefore’ .
    And also, confidence is really important! When I am nervous about if I can hear the whole story, I strain myself and try to understand all of the things the speaker says. And eventually I cannot understand what was the point. Having confidence and relaxing are very important I suppose.

    However, I couldn’t get the video in the first listening…
    Maybe the reason is that the content was not what I predidcted. And also, I did not get over after I could not hear clearly and keep thinking about ‘What was that she said right now?’ I shoud have abondoned the minor failures.

    Saya

  6. Takumi Nakanishi says:

    1. Did accessing your background information and predicting help you to understand the speech? If so, how? If not, why not?

    Accessing my background information and predicting did help me to understand the speech.
    For example, I learned about flow in some academic articles concerning Second Language Acquisition, so I didn’t have to pay attention to the main concept of flow theory she explained and I was able to listen to the details and get the clearer picture.

    Anyway, I’m sleepy. Something evil drives me to go back to my cozy futon, a promised land.
    Is there anything that saves me from this temptation? Game pattern?

    Takumi

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